Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Grace At Last

Lately, K's been saying we need a little grace around here.

It is well known that we are vaguely stuck in the religious practice department.

Still, K would like it if our family shared a little moment before we ate and said something that focused us on our meal and our time together in an intentional way.

"I want to write a grace for us to say," he told me.
"Okay," I said.
K describes his own decision making process as geological because it often happens as quickly as continents shift position through plate tectonics.

Tonight, The Mayor hastened things along.
"I know what we can say for grace!" he shouted.
"Great! What is it?" I asked.
"Free at last, free at last, thank God Almighty I'm free at last!"
A goofy smile spread crookedly across my face as I imagined our family saying this every night.

K brought our plates to the table and sat down just as I started singing those words in the style of the Blind Boys of Alabama.

The children jumped down from their chairs and did a soulful dance around the table.

K looked slightly confused.

When this new grace wound down, the children climbed back into their chairs and met their dinner plates.
"Thank GOD," my hungry Rooster Girl said eying her plate, "food at LAST!"


27 comments:

Patience said...

I love your kids!! They always make me laugh!!

liliannattel said...

great kids!

Caroline said...

We do a "quaker-style" grace - hold hands, close our eyes, and have a moment of silence. All of our frequent guests know it by now :-) I think it's one of my fiance's favorite parts of joining our family. Now he's the one to bring it up and introduce it to new people (and he was raised in a family that was not religious and barely even ate dinner around the table together).

Merrily Down the Stream said...

UH-HUH!

at last, at last...

I'm so tired my eyes are spinning...

Merrily Down the Stream said...

We do Madeline's little prayer...

We love our bread
We love our butter
But most of all - we love each other.

Paula said...

Our family has struggled with this. I was raised catholic but don't like the "thee"s and "thou"s in most traditional prayers. Instead, I made one of my own:

God bless the mountains.
God bless the seas.
God bless my family and
God bless me. Amen.

It has been modified across the last 2 years to include clapping while saying it. It works for us for now.

Emily N said...

Oh that was so funny... big laugh out loud over here!! Your kids are hilarious. Now I'm going to think "food at last" instead of "free at last" every MLK Day (when I put on that speech for the kids!)

Magpie said...

Awesome.

furiousBall said...

so darn sweet. good kids = good mommies and daddies

Barb said...

I think your children would like this grace. Our Catholic school uses it in the Kindergarten classes. Our version goes a little bit faster.

http://www.dltk-kids.com/crafts/miscellaneous/johnny_appleseed_grace.htm

Kyla said...

Quite fitting!

HW said...

My husband always says something like "Thank you for this food; please bless the hands that prepared it."
When our son was about 4 and started saying our grace he would say "Thank you for this food, now help our hands to repair it...."

Nice.

Kelly said...

I. Love. Your. Family! You guys are hilarious.

Mamma said...

Big family dinner when I was 3 or 4 and the minister was there. I offered to say grace...

"Good potatoes
Good meat
Good God
Let's eat."

My relatives still ask if I want to say grace.

Anonymous said...

We are fans of holding hands and saying, "Thank you, God!" It's quick and to the point.
AM

Vodka Mom said...

hey- I loved that!!!

I am smiling right now.

movin down the road said...

we don't say grace. I am silently grateful every night when I actually get the meal on the table and the kids actually eat it without fighting with me about it. If I say grace, I might jinx it

WILLIAM said...

we are fans of the grace said in the Movie Christmas Vacation.

"I pledge aleegiance to the flag ...

bzybead said...

it is my grace now too. I'm practicing for Tahoe so that when I say it, Ruby will be like, wha???

myundiary@gmail.com said...

That is so cute.

Nicki said...

I think you should TOTALLY use that as your everyday grace!
Or you could always do the Johnny Appleseed Prayer! I love that one! Here is some people singing it on YouTube (except you're supposed to clap as you sing it)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJb83gM2Vpo

Devilish Southern Belle said...

Haha, sounds like Rooster had the right idea!

Amanda said...

We seek grace too, but sometimes I think it can best be found in absurdity— it does, after all, allow you to focus on what is at hand rather than all the other immaterial matters.

Heidi said...

We would take a moment to go around the table and every tell what the best and worst part of their day was, then followed by a simple Thank You.

Christine said...

Perfect! When my daughter was two, she was annoyed that her brother said grace all the time, so she decided she would say grace, she sang the "I Love You, You Love Me" song from Barney. It's one of my favorites and every once in a while I still do it (she's 11 now).

CJP said...

Apologies for the length - it's too hard to fit in a short space.

I have just finished "The Omnivore's Dilemma" and have been completely moved by it. Moved to eat local, grass fed, save the planet, etc.

The last chapter goes into our relationship with food and how saying grace matters. Recognizing the meal, how it came to us, blessing the life of an animal who we will now eat. It's so profound.

Barring a 400 pg read ( well worth it) At least, take a moment to consider your food before you eat.
Blessing those partaking and how we came to be fed today. Such a small thing, and so huge.

Rebeca said...

In the fickle and unforgiving recording industry, where being lauded or left to dry often hinges on riding the right trend, the journey of the Blind Boys of Alabama serves as a workshop on retaining one’s roots while remaining relevant. That the Blind Boys, formed in 1939 at the Alabama Institute for the Negro Blind, have endured a defection among black listeners from gospel to secular music, along with the Great Depression, Jim Crow and the civil rights movement—all while shouldering the double burdens of being black and blind—is a feat that will have even atheists humming “Amazing Grace.” The collective’s latest album, Down in New Orleans, was recorded post-Katrina and infuses jazz and soul into traditional gospel tunes, with the help of some of the Big Easy’s best musicians.